Status of violence against women in Honduras

Status of violence against women in Honduras

Honduras has been rated by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) as the country with the highest homicide rate in the world from 2010 until 2012, when the most recent report was issued.1 From 2005 to 2013, the number of violent deaths of women rose by 263.4%. This violence is the result of multiple factors, including high levels of economic inequity and inequality, poverty, corruption, militarization, and an ever increasing presence of organized crime and drug trafficking, all of which has a strong negative impact on the human rights of the population, and on the lives of women in particular.

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El Salvador Lacks Accurate Data on Child Migration

El Salvador Lacks Accurate Data on Child Migration

Officials at the Salvadoran Foreign Ministry do not have accurate data on the number of children who are traveling to the United States illegally at the hands of smugglers. The Vice Minister for Salvadorans Abroad, Liduvina Magarín, recently visited 12 sites that function as shelters, detention centers, and migrant processing centers located in the southern U.S. border. In a single day, these places received 310 Salvadoran children. Given the traffic and movement of people in recent months, it is speculated that the daily number of children passing through that border is between 500 and 600 Salvadoran children who have been sent with coyotes to the United States.

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A Day Like Today, Now.

A Day Like Today, Now.

On a day like today five years ago, I woke up with the noise of military planes crisscrossing the skies, and without light, without water, without news. It was June 28, 2009 and the chronicles of the impossible were yet to be written. In the entire world, even in Honduras, our generation thought that coups d’état had passed into history. We were wrong.

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Violence Against Women in Mexico and Central America and the Impact of U.S. Policy

Violence Against Women in Mexico and Central America and the Impact of U.S. Policy

When violence is attacked with violence, women become both victims and defenders. They are disproportionately and differently affected by violence, violation of human rights and the erosion of community. Yet Mesoamerican and the U.S. governments continue to fund militarist enforcement policies framed as counternarcotics or anti-terrorism that arm and train men to patrol and control the population that put women at great risk.

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